Have You Been Exposed To

WELCOME TO TOXIC CABIN AIR

Doctor's guide to pesticide exposure

Treating toxic exposure

 

Resource Links

{all_weblinks num_cols=[1] display_ldescription=[1]?}6{/all_weblinks}

 

RECOVERY RESOURCES

 

For more information about tosic cabin air also see www.Aerotoxic.org

 

Resources for Health and Sources of InformationTrue North Health   (Distilled water fast)

    Dr. Alan Goldhamer, D.C.
    1551 Pacific Ave.
    Santa Rosa,CA 95404
    www.healthpromoting.com
 
www.orthopathy.net
    International Hygienic Physicians who Support fasting out toxins


Regency Health Spa  (Distilled water fasting and juicing fast)
    Hallandale Beach Fl
    www.regencyhealthspa.com   

 

Judith Murawski Anderson
    Industrial Hygienist
    Association of Flight Attnedants-CWA, AFL-CIO

 

www.aerotoxic.org has many resources, including how to purchase a mask for your next flight.

 

Qi Gong is an excellent source for diet and foods that can aid in ridding the body of toxins.  Their book on healing smoothies is of great assistance for anyone fighting suspected exposure.         www.QiGong.com


Professor Christopher Van Netten
James Mather Building, Room 5
5804 Fairview Avenue
Vancouver, BCv6T 1Z3

 

Medical contacts
    Through aerotoxic.org


    We may be able to assist with more, email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Dr. Peter Julu
    http://www.breakspearmedical.com/

 

The Environmental Health Center-Dallas

     www.ehcd.com

     A medical fascility whose emphasis is on the relationship of health to environmental factors, including exposure to toxic chemicals and neurotoxicity.

RECOVERY RESOURCES

Resources for Health and Sources of Information

True North Health (Distilled water fast)
    Dr. Alan Goldhamer, D.C.
    1551 Pacific Ave.
    Santa Rosa,CA 95404
    www.healthpromoting.com
 
www.orthopathy.net
    International Hygienic Physicians who Support fasting out toxins


Regency Health Spa  (distilled water fast and juicing fast)
    Hallandale Beach Fl
    www.regencyhealthspa.com   

Judith Murawski Anderson
    Industrial Hygienist
    Association of Flight Attnedants-CWA, AFL-CIO

www.aerotoxic.org has many resources, including how to purchase a mask for your next flight.

Qi Gong is an excellent source for diet and foods that can aid in ridding the body of toxins.  Their book on healing smoothies is of great assistance for anyone fighting suspected exposure.  Www.QiGong.com


Professor Christopher Van Netten
James Mather Building, Room 5
5804 Fairview Avenue
Vancouver, BCv6T 1Z3

Medical contacts
    through www.aerotoxic.org/
    We may be able to assist with more, email us at 

                                  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Peter Julu
    http://www.breakspearmedical.com/

THINK YOU HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO OIL FUMES ON AN AIRCRAFT?

FIND OUT. GET TESTED. (NOTICE: this procedure is not available and has been disallowed.  We are leaving it here to demonstrate what was attempted to be set up for testing potential exposure through a flight attendant union, but rejected)

 

 

Click here for all four forms you will need to have your blood analyzed for at least one form of the neurotoxic engine oil additives called tricresyl phosphates. To have your blood tested, it must be drawn within 48 hours of suspected/confirmed exposure to aviation engine oil fumes. Note that the University of Nebraska research team cannot know the identity of the blood donor (crew member/passenger), so the blood sample must be coded and shipped by a physician/laboratory staff.

If you would like to send a blood sample, here are step-by-step instructions:

1)    Read this letter;

2)    Take the blood draw/shipping instructions and blood test requisition form to a doctor or lab.

Read more...

Forms For Testing For TCP in your Blood Stream

To get blood analyzed for at least one form of TCP after an exposure to engine oil fumes, crew-members/passengers were originally set up to follow this procedure and check for TOCP exposure:
                       

1) Take attached instructions to draw/ship blood and blood test requisition form to doctor or lab.
2) Have 50 ml of blood drawn within 48 hours of suspected exposure to oil fumes.
3) Complete 1.5 page questionnaire.

Prof. Oksana Lockridge (or her staff) will notify the lab/doctor of the result (positive/negative).

Then blood would be sent for analysis as part of a program with the flight attendants union in the US.  That has been disallowed and now we are investigating other procedures for testing blood for TOCP exposure.


                                           

                                           
                                       
                             

Inhalable Toxic Chemicals in Aircraft Cabin Air

THINK YOU HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO OIL FUMES ON AN AIRCRAFT? 

The Workshop "Inhalable Toxic Chemicals in Aircraft Cabin Air" (ITCOBA), held on 11

 

Cranfield University Seminar Press Release

October 2011 at Cranfield University, was organized in order to respond to the disinformation that has increasingly surrounded the issue of whether aircraft cabin air is contaminated with organophosphate neurotoxins, and whether those substances caused ill-health. 

 

The issue has most recently been brought into focus by the publication earlier this year, by the UK Department of Transport, of the "Aircraft Cabin Air Sampling Study" reporting work carried out by the Institute of Environment and Health at Cranfield University. This report actually found significant concentrations of organophosphate neurotoxins and other noxious substances in cabin air even under normal flying conditions. Unfortunately, the final conclusion of the report is the statement: "With respect to the conditions of flight that were experienced during the study, there was no evidence for target pollutants occurring in the cabin at levels exceeding available health and safety standards and guidelines." The first phrase underlines the fact that the study failed to achieve measurement of a "fume event", even though that was one of its principal objectives. Even for "normal flying conditions" the purported conclusion is irrelevant because no standards are available for some of the most problematical substances. Nevertheless, despite the fact that this "conclusion" is neither sound nor justified by the actual work carried out, it has been carelessly and uncritically quoted, including by the UK Minister for Transport Theresa Villiers, and widely used to infer that there is no safety and health problem.

Read more...

Health Impact Of Exposure To Contaminated Supply Air On Commercial Aircraft

Quick Reference Guide for use by and reference use 

                           For Health Care Providers:

 

Summary of exposure and substance: Outside air is bled off the engines/auxiliary power unit and supplied to the cabin/ flight deck on commercial aircraft. Under certain failure conditions, toxins such as pyrolyzed (burned at high temperatures)  engine oils and hydraulic fluids may leak into the aircraft cabin and flight deck air supply systems. Airline workers may develop acute and/or chronic health effects and seek attention from health care providers. This quick guide focuses on oil exposures. The complete reference guide is available at www.ohrca.org/healthguide.html.

Exposures: These are often called "Fume Events".  The "bleed air" is not filtered and contaminant levels are not monitored. Airborne toxins include a complex mixture of oil-based compounds, irritant gases, and ultra-fine particles. Exposures of particular concern include tricresylphosphates (TCPs) and N-phenyl-L-naphthylamine (PAN), and carbon monoxide (CO). The primary exposure pathway is inhalation. Some crewmembers describe low-level chronic exposures to fumes (e.g., routine and transient fumes on engine start up); others describe acute, visible fume events, which may result in a flight diversion or cancellation. Other exposures in the cabin/flight deck include ozone gas, insecticides, de-icing fluid, exhaust and fuel fumes, and cleaning products. Also, the cabin altitude is typically 6,000-8,000 feet inflight, with a corresponding reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen.

Documentation: Crewmembers submit written reports of smoke, fumes and/or odor to their airline. Aircraft mechanical records and pilot log book entries sometimes document air supply contamination. Health care providers can request Material Safety Data Sheets for the particular oil/hydraulic fluid. Healthcare providers or the exposed injured person should ask for the date, flight number, aircraft number, aircraft type, phase of flight when the problem was noted, whether there was odor or visible smoke/fumes, duration, whether the aircraft was sprayed with insecticides, the last maintenance record especially involving the oil seals and any supplementary documentation from the airline/maintenance regarding cause. Obtain past medical history, occupational history, and family/social health history.

Health Effects: The most common symptoms reported are acute respiratory, neurological, systemic, and/or psychiatric symptoms. These typically occur within minutes to a few hours following the contaminated bleed air event or exposure. Symptoms vary depending on the duration and magnitude of exposure, plus individual factors. Chronic and sometimes delayed neurological, psychiatric, resperatory, systemic, and dermal symptoms have been reported.  Toxic encephalopathy is the primary concern. 

Suggested Case Definition: If there is either a documented exposure to bleed air contaminants or a history of flying on aircraft type(s) documented to have an increased risk of air supply contamination events, and Initial symptoms occur within 48 hours following exposure, a medical professional should look for  acute and/or persistent respiratory, neurological, systemic, or psychiatric symptoms.  Toxic exposure and toxic encephalopathy due to exposure to TOCP in the cabin has been mistaken for panic disorder or other non related psychiatric conditions.  Note that crewmembers with routine, low-level exposures may also develop chronic symptoms but may not have documented acute, individual exposure events. Symptoms may start many months or years prior to examination by the HCP. Attempt to identify the exposure and make a precise diagnosis (e.g., avoid generic terminology such as "inhalation exposure") based on a combination of symptoms and objective evidence of health effects (physical examination findings and/or medical tests).  Familiarize yourself with potential symptoms such  as those referenced on this website under "experiences" and "my story".  Please take the time to consider exposure to toxic cabin air.  Pet scans and MRI's can be of value in diagnosing and evaluating exposure and effects of toxic cabin air.